Bank Fees Deductions

Footnotes to U.S. International transactions tables 1-12.

General notes for all tames: (p) Preliminary. (r) Revised. 0
Transactions are possible, but are zero for a given period. (*)
Transactions are less than $500,000([+ or -]). (D) Suppressed to avoid
disclosure of data of individual companies. n.a. Transactions are
possible, but data are not available. … Not applicable, or for data
periods 1960-1997, transactions that are 0, “not available,”
or “not applicable.” Quarterly estimates are not
annualized

Of or relating to a variable that has been mathematically converted to a yearly rate. Inflation and interest rates are generally annualized since it is on this basis that these two variables are ordinarily stated and compared.
 and are expressed at quarterly rates.

Table 1:

(1.) Credits, +: Exports of
goods and services

 and income receipts;

unilateral
 /uni·lat·er·al/ () affecting only one side.


adj.
On, having, or confined to only one side.
 current transfers to the
United States
 officially United States of America, republic (2005 est. pop. 295,734,000), 3,539,227 sq mi (9,166,598 sq km), North America. The United States is the world’s third largest country in population and the fourth largest country in area.
; capital account
transactions receipts; financial inflows–increase in foreign-owned
assets (U.S. liabilities) or decrease in U.S.-owned assets (U.S.
claims).

Debits, -: Imports of goods and services and income payments;
unilateral current transfers to foreigners; capital account transactions
payments; financial outflows–decrease in foreign-owned assets (U.S.
liabilities) or increase in U.S.-owned assets (U.S. claims).

(2.) See table 2 footnotes for explanations of the various balance
of payments adjustments made to convert goods on a Census-basis to goods
on a balance of payments basis. The adjustments are made to improve
coverage, eliminate duplication and align the goods data with national
and international accounting guidelines.

(3.) Includes some goods: Mainly military equipment and supplies in
lines 5 and 22 that are commingled in the source data and cannot be
separately identified. Beginning with statistics for 1999, line 5
excludes equipment and supplies exported under the U.S.
Foreign Military
Sales

 program that can be separately identified, and line 22 excludes
petroleum purchases abroad by U.S. military agencies that can be
separately identified.

(4.) Includes transfers of goods and services under U.S. military
grant programs.

(5.) Beginning in 1982, these lines are presented on a gross basis.
The definition of exports is revised to exclude U.S. parents’
payments to foreign affiliates and to include U.S. affiliates’
receipts from foreign parents. The definition of imports is revised to
include U.S. parents’ payments to foreign affiliates and to exclude
U.S. affiliates’ receipts from foreign parents.

(6.) Beginning in 1982, the “other transfers” component
includes taxes paid by U.S. private residents to foreign governments and
taxes paid by private nonresidents to the U.S. Government.

(7.) At the present time, all U.S. Treasury-owned gold is held in
the United States.

(8.) Includes sales of foreign obligations to foreigners.

(9.) Consists of bills, certificates, marketable bonds and notes,
and
nonmarketable
  
adj.
1. Of or relating to a security that may not be sold by one investor to another but is generally redeemable by the issuer within limitations; nonnegotiable.

2.
 convertible and nonconvertible bonds and notes.

(10.) Consists of U.S. Treasury and Export-Import Bank obligations,
not included elsewhere, and of debt securities of U.S. Government
corporations and agencies.

(11.) Includes, primarily, U.S. Government liabilities associated
with military agency sales contracts and other transactions arranged
with or through foreign official agencies; see table 6.

(12.) Consists of investments in U.S. corporate stocks and in debt
securities of private corporations and state and local governments.

(13.) Conceptually, the sum of line 77 and line 39 is equal to
“net lending or net borrowing” in the national income and
product accounts (NIPAs). However, the foreign transactions account in
the NIPAs (a) includes adjustments to the international transactions
accounts for the treatment of gold, (b) includes adjustments for the
different geographical treatment of transactions with U.S. territories
and
Puerto Rico
 , island (2005 est. pop. 3,917,000), 3,508 sq mi (9,086 sq km), West Indies, c.1,000 mi (1,610 km) SE of Miami, Fla.
, and (c) includes services furnished without payment by
financial pension plans except life insurance carriers and private
noninsured pension plans. A reconciliation of the
balance on goods and
services

 from the international accounts and the NIPA net exports
appears in reconciliation table 2 in appendix A in this issue of the
SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS. A reconciliation of the other foreign
transactions in the two sets of accounts appears in table 4.3B of the
full set of NIPA tables.

(14.) Beginning with 2003, includes securities brokers’ claims
on their foreign affiliates. Prior to 2003, they are included in the
claims of nonbanking concerns.

(15.) Beginning with 2003, includes securities brokers’
liabilities to their foreign affiliates. Prior to 2003, they are
included in the liabilities of nonbanking concerns.

(16.) Calculated excluding capital account transactions, net (line
39).

(17.) Equals the sum of financial derivatives for the first,
second, and third quarters of the year. Appears only with the
preliminary release of annual statistics for a given year.

Additional footnotes for historical data in July issues of the
SURVEY:

(18.) For 1974, includes extraordinary U.S. Government transactions
with India. See “Special U.S. Government Transactions,” June
1974 SURVEY, p. 27.

(19.) For 1978-83, includes foreign currency-denominated notes sold
to private residents abroad.

(20.) Break in series. See Technical Notes in the June 1989-90,
1992-95, and July 1996-2010 issues of the SURVEY.

Table 2:

(1.) Exports, Census basis, represent transactions values, f.a.s.
U.S, port of exportation; imports, Census basis, represent Customs
values.
Seasonally adjusted

 data reflect the application of seasonal
factors developed jointly by BEA and the U.S.
Census Bureau

 (CENSUS).

(2.) Difference between transactions included in primary source
data provided to BEA by the U.S. Department of Defense and transactions
included in the Census trade data. Negative values may result from
timing differences for transactions recorded in the two data sets.

(3.) Addition for low-value (below reporting threshold)
transactions for 1999-2009 to phase in a revised low-value methodology
that was implemented by CENSUS beginning with statistics for 2010.

(4.) Addition of electric energy exports to Mexico; deduction of
exposed motion picture film for sale or rental; net change in stock of
U.S.-owned grains in storage in Canada; valuation of software exports at
market value; and coverage adjustments for special situations where
certain exports are not included in the Census data.

(5.) Addition of electric energy imports from Mexico; deduction of
exposed motion picture film for sale or rental; deduction of the value
of repairs of U.S. vessels abroad; and coverage adjustments for special
situations where certain imports are not included in the Census data.

(6.) Annual and unadjusted quarterly data shown in this table
correspond to country and area data in table 12, lines 3 and 20. Trade
with international organizations includes purchases of nonmonetary gold
from the International Monetary Fund, transfers of tin to the

International Tin Council

, and sales of satellites to Intelsat. Members
of
OPEC
 see Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries.


OPEC
 in full Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries

Multinational organization established in 1960 to coordinate the petroleum production and export policies of its
 include Algeria, Angola (beginning with the first quarter of
2007), Ecuador (beginning with the fourth quarter of 2007), Indonesia
(ending with the fourth quarter of 2008), Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya,
Nigeria, Qatar,
Saudi Arabia
 , officially Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, kingdom (2005 est. pop.
,
United Arab Emirates
 federation of sheikhdoms (2005 est. pop. 2,563,000), c.30,000 sq mi (77,700 sq km), SE Arabia, on the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman.
, and Venezuela.

(7.) Lines B24, B83, and B142 include CENSUS’s reconciliation
of discrepancies between the goods statistics published by the United
States and the counterpart statistics published by Canada. These
adjustments are distributed to the affected end-use categories in
section C. Beginning in 1986, estimates for undocumented exports to
Canada, the largest item in the U.S.-Canadian reconciliation, are
included in Census basis data shown in line A1.

Table 3:

(1.) Royalties and license fees and “other private
services” by detailed type of service include both affiliated and
unaffiliated transactions.

(2.) Includes royalties, license fees, and other fees associated
with intangible assets, including patents, trade secrets, and other
proprietary rights, that are used in connection with the production of
goods.

(3.) Includes royalties, license fees, and other fees associated
with copyrights, trademarks, franchises, rights to broadcast five
events, software licensing fees, distribution of film and television
recordings and other intellectual property rights.

(4.) Other services receipts (exports) include mainly expenditures
of foreign residents working temporarily in the United States. Payments
(imports) include mainly expenditures of U.S. residents temporarily
working abroad.

(5.) These reflect the amount of premiums explicitly charged by, or
paid to, insurers and reinsurers.

Table 4:

(1.) Beginning with 2003, includes interest on securities
brokers’ claims on their foreign affiliates. Prior to 2003, it is
included in the interest on claims of nonbanking concerns.

(2.) Beginning with 2003, gross interest receipts on U.S. holdings
of special drawing rights (SDRs) are included in U.S. government
receipts. Prior to 2003, interest receipts on U.S. holdings of SDRs, net
of interest payments on U.S. allocations of SDRs, are included in U.S.
government receipts.

(3.) Beginning with 2003, includes interest on securities
brokers’ liabilities to their foreign affiliates. Prior to 2003, it
is included in the interest on liabilities of nonbanking concerns.

(4.) Beginning in 2003, gross interest payments on U.S. allocations
of SDRs are included in U.S. government payments. Prior to 2003,
interest receipts on U.S. holdings of SDRs, net of interest payments on
U.S. allocations of SDRs, are included in U.S. government receipts.

Table 5:

(1.) Complete instrument detail is only available beginning with
2003.

(2.) Prior to 2003, includes only demand deposits and
nonnegotiable
  
adj.
1. Difficult or impossible to settle by arbitration, mediation, or mutual concession:

2. Nonmarketable.
 time and
savings deposits

.

Table 6:

(1.) Expenditures to release foreign governments from their
contractual liabilities to pay for military goods and services purchased
through military sales contracts–first authorized (for Israel) under
Public Law 93-199, section 4, and subsequently authorized (for many
recipients) under similar legislation–are included in line A4.
Deliveries against these military sales contracts are included in line
C10; see
footnote

 2. Of the line A4 items, part of these military
expenditures is applied in lines A43 and A46 to reduce short-term assets
previously recorded in lines A41 and C8; this application of funds is
excluded from lines C3 and C4. A second part of line A4 expenditures
finances future deliveries under military sales contracts for the
recipient countries and is applied directly to lines A42 and C9. A third
part of line A4, disbursed directly to finance purchases by recipient
countries from commercial suppliers in the United States, is included in
line A37. A fourth part of line A4, representing dollars paid to the
recipient countries to finance purchases from countries other than the
United States, is included in line A48.

(2.) Transactions under military sales contracts are those in which
the Department of Defense sells and transfers military goods and
services to a foreign purchaser, on a cash or credit basis. Purchases by
foreigners directly from commercial suppliers are not included as
transactions under military sales contracts.

(3.) The identification of transactions involving direct dollar
outflows from the United States is made in reports by each operating
agency.

(4.) Line A38 includes foreign currency collected as interest and
line A43 includes foreign currency collected as principal, as recorded
in lines A16 and A17, respectively.

(5.) Includes (a) advance payments to the Department of Defense (on
military sales contracts) financed by loans extended to foreigners by
U.S. Government agencies and (b) the contra-entry for the part of line
C10 that was delivered without
prepayment

 by the foreign purchaser. Also
includes expenditures of appropriations available to release foreign
purchasers from liability to make repayment.

(6.) Includes purchases of loans from U.S. banks and exporters and
payments by the U.S. Government under commercial export credit and
investment guarantee programs.

(7.) Excludes liabilities associated with military sales contracts
financed by U.S. Government grants and credits and included in line C2.

(8.) Excludes transactions of the U.S. Enrichment Corporation since
it became a non-government entity in July 1998.

(9.) Beginning in the fourth quarter of 2007, includes drawings and
repayments under temporary reciprocal currency arrangements between the
U.S. Federal Reserve System and foreign
central banks

 that do not meet
the strict definition of U.S.
reserve assets

.

(10.) Includes allocations of special drawing rights (SDRs) in the
third quarter of 2009.

Table 7:

(1.) Interest on intercompany debt between financial parent
companies and their financial affiliates is excluded from direct
investment income. Prior to 2007, interest on the permanent debt
investment of bank parent companies in their bank affiliates was
included in direct investment income.

(2.) Intercompany debt investment between financial parent
companies and their financial affiliates is excluded from direct
investment financial flows. Prior to 2007, the permanent debt investment
of bank parent companies in their bank affiliates was included in direct
investment financial flows.

Table 8:

(1.) Beginning with 2005, source data for new issue estimates are
no longer separately available. New issues continue to be included in
net purchases.

(2.) Bahamas, Bermuda,
British West Indies
 see West Indies; West Indies Federation.
 (
Cayman Islands
 , British dependency (2005 est. pop. 44,300), 100 sq mi (259 sq km), comprising three islands in the West Indies.
), and
prior to 2011,
Netherlands Antilles
 island group, an autonomous part of the Netherlands (2005 est. pop. 220,000), 371 sq mi (961 sq km), West Indies. Formerly known as the Dutch West Indies and Netherlands West Indies, they are divided into two groups.
. Beginning with 2011, also includes
the islands of the former Netherlands Antilles.

Table 9:

(1.) Prior to 2003, securities brokers’ claims on and
liabilities to their foreign affiliates are included in the estimates.
They are excluded beginning in 2003.

(2.) Complete instrument detail is only available beginning with
2003.

(3.) Financial intermediaries’ accounts are shown under
“other claims (liabilities)” because the majority of these
claims (liabilities) are in the form of intercompany balances. Financial
intermediaries’ accounts represent transactions between firms in a
direct investment relationship (that is, between U.S. parents and their
foreign affiliates or between U.S. affiliates and their foreign parent
groups), where both the U.S. and foreign firms are classified in a
finance industry, but the firms are neither banks nor securities
brokers.

(4.) Bahamas, Bermuda, British West Indies (Cayman Islands), and
prior to 2011, Netherlands Antilles. Beginning with 2011, also includes
the islands of the former Netherlands Antilles.

Table 10:

(1.) Beginning with 2003, includes securities brokers’ claims
on their foreign affiliates.

(2.) Complete instrument detail is only available beginning with
2003.

(3.) Includes foreign official agencies and international and
regional organizations. Prior to 2003, also includes government-owned
corporations and state, provincial, and local governments and their
agencies.

(4.) U.S.-owned banks include U.S.-chartered banks, Edge Act
subsidiaries, and U.S. bank holding companies. Foreign-owned banks
include U.S. branches and agencies of foreign banks and majority-owned
bank subsidiaries in the United States. Brokers and dealers may be
U.S.-owned or foreign-owned.

(5.) Commercial paper issued in the U.S. market by foreign
incorporated entities and held in U.S. customers’ accounts.
Excludes commercial paper issued through foreign direct investment
affiliates in the United States.

(6.) Prior to 2003, includes
negotiable certificates of deposit

 and
other
negotiable

 and transferable instruments.

(7.) Prior to 2003, includes only deposits.

(8.) Bahamas, Bermuda, British West Indies (Cayman Islands), and
prior to 2011, Netherlands Antilles. Beginning with 2011, also includes
the islands of the former Netherlands Antilles.

Table 11:

(1.) Beginning with 2003, includes securities brokers’
liabilities to their foreign affiliates.

(2.) Complete instrument detail is only available beginning with
2003.

(3.) U.S.-owned banks include U.S.-chartered banks, Edge Act
subsidiaries, and U.S. bank holding companies. Foreign-owned banks
include U.S. branches and agencies of foreign banks and majority-owned
bank subsidiaries in the United States. Brokers and dealers may be
U.S.-owned or foreign-owned.

(4.) Bahamas, Bermuda, British West Indies (Cayman Islands), and
prior to 2011, Netherlands Antilles. Beginning with 2011, also includes
the islands of the former Netherlands Antilles.

Table 12:

For footnotes 1-15, see table 1.

(16.) At the global level, the statistical discrepancy, which is
the amount that balances the sum of recorded credits and debits,
represents
net errors and omissions

 in recorded transactions. For
individual countries and regions, it also represents discrepancies that
arise when transactions with one country or region are settled through
transactions with another country or region or when transactions cannot
be separately identified for individual countries or regions.

(17.) Details not shown separately; see totals in lines 56 and 63.

(18.) Details not shown separately are included in line 69.

(19.) Estimates of financial derivatives for several countries are
not available separately. Estimates for Luxembourg are included in Other
Euro area. Estimates for Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela are
included in Other South and
Central America
 narrow, southernmost region (c.202,200 sq mi/523,698 sq km) of North America, linked to South America at Colombia. It separates the Caribbean from the Pacific.
. Estimates for China,
Hong
Kong

 , Mandarin Xianggang, special administrative region of China, formerly a British crown colony (2005 est. pop. 6,899,000), land area 422 sq mi (1,092 sq km), adjacent to Guangdong prov.
, India, Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan are included in Other Asia and
Pacific. Estimates for
South Africa
 Afrikaans Suid-Afrika, officially Republic of South Africa, republic (2005 est. pop. 44,344,000), 471,442 sq mi (1,221,037 sq km), S Africa.
 are included in Other Africa. In
addition, estimates for the Middle East are combined with estimates for
Asia and Pacific and included in Other Asia and Pacific.

(20.) Calculated excluding capital account transactions, net (line
39).

(21.) Equals the sum of capital account transactions, net for the
first, second, and third quarters of the year.

(22.) Includes, as part of international and unallocated, taxes
withheld; current-cost adjustments associated with U.S. and foreign
direct investment; and net U.S. currency flows. Before 1999, also
includes the estimated U.S. direct investment in foreign affiliates
engaged in international shipping, in operating oil and gas drilling
equipment internationally, and in petroleum trading. Before 1996, also
includes small transactions in business services that are not reported
by country.

NOTE. Definitions for geographic areas are available on BEA’s
Web site at www.bea.gov. Country data are based on information available
from U.S. reporting sources. In some instances, the statistics may not
necessarily reflect the ultimate foreign transactor. For instance: U.S.
goods export statistics reflect country of reported destination; in many
cases the goods may be trans-shipped to third countries (especially true
for the Netherlands and Germany). The geographic breakdown of securities
transactions reflects the country with which transactions occurred but
may not necessarily reflect the ultimate sources of foreign funds or
ultimate destination of U.S. funds.