Federal Bank Deposit Insurance Corporation

U.s. History homework!?

1) what immediate steps did president Roosevelt take in his first term to put the banking system to become more stable?

2) what did the Works Progress Adminstartion workers do and how did the program affect their spirits?

3) what impressive physical legacy did the new deal have?

Please help!! I have a test tomorrow and I’m not prepared! And oo the time period for there questions is around the 1930’s!

1- Among the measures enacted were the following:
Emergency Banking Act (March 9), to increase help for and regulation of the nation’s banks;
Economy Act (March 20), to cut federal costs through reorganization of and cuts in salaries and veterans’ pensions;
Beer-Wine Revenue Act* (March 22), to legalize and tax wine and beer;
Civilian Conservation Corps Act (March 31), to create work camps for 250,000 men ages 18 to 25;
Federal Emergency Relief Act (May 12), to establish a federal agency to distribute $500 million to states and localities for relief;
Agricultural Adjustment Act (May 12), to establish a federal agency to decrease crop surpluses by subsidizing farmers to cut back production;
Thomas Amendment to the Agricultural Adjustment Act, to permit the president to inflate the currency in various ways;
Tennessee Valley Authority Act (May 18), to allow the federal government to build dams and power plants in the Tennessee Valley, to generate and sell the power, and to engage in area development;
Federal Securities Act (May 27), to stiffen regulation of the securities business;
Joint resolution to abandon the gold standard (June 5);
National Employment System Act (June 6), to create the U.S. Employment Service;
Home Owners Refinancing Act (June 13), to establish the Home Owners Loan Corporation to refinance non-farm home mortgages;
Glass-Steagall Banking Act (June 16), to institute various banking reforms, including establishing the Federal Bank Deposit Insurance Corporation;
Farm Credit Act (June 16), to provide for the refinancing of farm mortgages;
Emergency Railroad Transportation Act (June 16), to increase federal regulation of railroads; and the
National Industrial Recovery Act (June 16), to establish the National Recovery Administration and the Public Works Administration.
2 – The Works Progress Administration (renamed during 1939 as the Work Projects Administration; WPA) was the largest and most ambitious New Deal agency, employing millions to carry out public works projects, including the construction of public buildings and roads, and operated large arts, drama, media, and literacy projects. It fed children and redistributed food, clothing, and housing. Almost every community in the United States had a park, bridge or school constructed by the agency, which especially benefited rural and Western populations. Expenditures from 1936 to 1939 totaled nearly $7 billion.[1] The budget at the outset of the WPA in 1935 was 1.4 billion dollars. It provided work for three million “employables” at this time, however there were an estimated 10 million unemployed persons at this time. [2] By 1943, the total amount spent was over $11 billion.[3]
The WPA was a national program that originated its own projects (in cooperation with state and local governments) and sometimes took over state and local relief programs that had originated in the Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC) or FERA programs. Headed by Harry Hopkins, the WPA provided jobs and income to the unemployed during the Great Depression in the United States. Between 1935 and 1943, the WPA provided almost eight million jobs.[4] It never managed to come anywhere close to full demand for employment.[5]
Liquidated on June 30, 1943 as a result of high employment due to the industry boom of World War Two, the WPA had provided millions of Americans with jobs for 8 years.[6] Most people who needed a job were eligible for at least some of its positions.[7] Hourly wages were typically set to the prevailing wages in each area.[8] However workers could not be paid more than 30 hours a week. Before 1940, there was very little training to teach new skills, to meet the objections of the labor unions.
3 – The process began fifteen years or so before Levittown broke ground. First, the New Deal rationalized the organization of mortgage lending, refinancing more than a million homes threatened with foreclosure during the early years of the Depression and then introducing a system of mortgage insurance that took a great deal of the risk out of speculative development. The G. I. Bill guaranteed loans to returning veterans for the purchase of homes, putting home-ownership within the grasp of thousands for the first time. In 1941, Congress passed Title VI of the National Housing Act to promote housebuilding for defense workers. Immediately after the war, the limit on Title VI loans was raised to 90 percent of a nine-thousand-dollar house, effectively supplying housebuilders with all the working capital they needed to carry out large-scale construction at minimal risk. (Early Levitt homes cost around eight thousand dollars). Federal highway-building programs guaranteed that workers newly displaced to the outlying suburbs would have easy access to jobs in the city. Shamefully, government insistence on racially segregated developments added a further spur to suburban housing demand—white fright propelling white flight.

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